Tom McKeown asked Doris Sims, 3/28/2016 10:56:26 PM

Should you let employees know not only that they are successors for a position but also who else might be one and where they rank versus each other?

1 Answer, 0 Comments
3/29/2016 4:39:28 PM,
Doris Sims replied:

This is an excellent question that many people have.  So here is a "rule of thumb" you can use whenever you wonder - should we do this within our talent benchstrength strategy:

Talent Benchstrength Rule of Thumb: If you wouldn't do it in your external talent strategy, then don't do it in your internal talent benchstrength strategy. If you do that in your external talent strategy, then you should do it also in your internal talent benchstrength strategy.

Examples:

1. You would never tell an external candidate the names of the other external candidates for a job, and you would never tell them how they rank with the other job candidates.  So no, don't tell internal candidates the names of other internal successor candidates, and certainly don't tell them how they rank as a successor candidate with other internal successor candidates.

2. You conduct reporting on the EEOC categories of external job candidates, to help ensure that you are reaching a diverse group of candidates from the available pool of talent.  So analyze and report the EEOC categories of internal job candidatses to help ensure you are reaching and developing a diverse group of candidates from the available pool of talent.

Internal talent benchstrength policies and procedures are subject to review by agencies such as the EEOC and OFCCP to ensure you are following consistent policies and procedures that don't cause disparate treatment to employees, just as they do for external talent recruiting.